Posterior samples – July wrap

I had some Posterior Samples to share before going on leave but didn’t get around to posting them. Here’s what’s been on my mind this month:

Maths and science units are popular with (Kentucky) students until they realise that they’re hard. While not directly relevant to the Australian university education model it’s probably an important thing for the Science and Engineering Faculty to keep in mind.

I’m looking at ggplot2 more these days, so the idea of a “grammar of graphics” is beginning to resonate with me. Here’s a talk about building one for clojure (which I don’t use).

Something for me to keep in mind when delivering SEB113 slides this semester is what your maths slides don’t need. Probably also good pointers for any PhD students graduating soon.

An interesting article in the New York Times about air pollution from cooking. This is something that ILAQH has a research interest in and our nanotracer paper contains a bit of analysis of inhaled surface area dose from particles that originate from cooking.

Another NYT article, this time with a delicious visualisation of the geographical trends in income disparity and social mobility.

Andrew Gelman writes at Slate about some of the problems with scientific publishing and the publication of spurious findings (which isn’t always willingly dishonest).

A special “Big Bayes Stories” issue of “Statistical Science” will be published soon, focussing on the real world application of Bayesian statistics where other methods were inapplicable. Christian Robert has written the preface; the issue is being edited by Robert, Kerrie Mengersen (one of my PhD supervisors) and Sharon McGrayne, author of “The Theory That Would Not Die“.

Also I went to Questacon and it was awesome.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s